My Criterion Wish List

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It’s not exactly a mystery that I’m a huge fan (dare I say “fanboy”?) of the Criterion Collection, that distribution company which releases some of the greatest, strangest, and most important films on DVD and Blu-ray. Someone recently asked me what my wish list of Criterion releases would be, and I thought to myself, “Oh gosh, how can I even think?” So, I narrowed it down to a few and instead oof writing a long essay on my choices, I thought I might write what I would want or hope to imagine would be on the back of the cover. You know, those long winded paragraphs explaining why the film is in the collection, that, despite the number of syllables in each sentence, manage to be surprisingly succinct. (These are not necessarily films that “deserve” to be there, but ones I would like to be there nonetheless, because I think they deserve it.) Well, here it goes, my Criterion Wish List.

Bringing Up Baby (1938) | Directed by Howard Hawks

Though it was scorned upon its initial release, continuing Hepburn’s reputation as “box office poison”, Howard Hawks’ brilliant film set the standard for the screwball comedy. Hepburn and Grant jump through wacky scenarios with great aplomb, and while its humor never ceases in any sense of the word, it is also the clever innuendos and sly commentary on the battle of the sexes that make this 1938 film a classic and on numerous lists as one of the best comedies ever made.

Stranger Than Fiction (2006) | Directed by Marc Forster

Harold Crick hears voices in his head, but it isn’t schizophrenia. It’s someone narrating his life. Yes, Will Ferrell’s nuanced performance as Crick is the protagonist of a novel, and this, shall we say, “novel” approach to the existential drama makes for a memorable, yet underrated film. Filled with raw emotion, contemplations on the nature of tragedy and comedy, and clever visual effects, Marc Forster’s Stranger Than Fiction is a unique, funny, and breathless film. (Art by grannyhall)

Manhattan (1979) | Directed by Woody Allen

While Annie Hall may have marked a change in Woody Allen’s style, his masterpiece Manhattan marked the true transition from the laugh a minute bonkers style of Bananas to the more mature and heartfelt comedy of his later career. Photographed in gorgeous black and white by Gordon Willis, scored to the swelling and bustling music of George Gershwin, and set against the intellectual circles of Upper East Side Manhattan, Allen’s triumph is an exploration of relationships, maturity, intellect vs. morality, ethics, and love. (Art by trespasserswillbebeaten)

Clue (1985) | Directed by Jonathan Lynn

Is Clue the best film adaptation of a board game of all time? Taking place at the height of the Red Scare, while McCarthyism is rampant and J. Edgar Hoover has everyone on his list, Clue takes a group of people who are all connected by Washington DC and… a murder. But who did it, where, and with what? An all star cast presents a number of hilarious suspects. As the bodies stack, so the laughs, and beneath the veneer of hilariousness is a look at the effects of paranoia and Communism in the upper class. (Art by vargtimmen)

Mulholand Dr. (2001) | Directed by David Lynch

He made his mark in the 1970s with the cult classic Eraserhead and later in television with the iconic Twin Peaks. But David Lynch’s most poisonous love letter to Hollywood and cinema would start off as a pilot and transform into one of the most intriguing and enigmatic puzzle box films ever made. Mulholland Dr. puzzled audiences upon its release and continues to do so to this day. Featuring stellar performances from Naomi Watts and Laura Harring, travel down the road into a dream world and a nightmare. (Art by Midnight Marauder.)

Oslo, August 31st (2012) | Directed by Joachim Trier

He started out as a skateboarder, but Joachim Trier triggers more than mere adrenaline in his humane drama and loose remake of Louis Malles’s The Fire Within. In Oslo, August 31st, a young man just out of rehab (played beautifully by Anders Danielsen Lie) comes back to his home town once more to say goodbye. Few films are as raw and meticulously imbued with feeling as this outstanding Norwegian drama from one of the up and coming directors of this generation. (Art by grannyhall)

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8 thoughts on “My Criterion Wish List

    KD Tolliver (@KiloDeltaTango) said:
    April 11, 2013 at 11:01 pm

    The Fire Within is actually a Louis Malle film.

      rots28 responded:
      April 11, 2013 at 11:11 pm

      CRAP and I knew that! Slip of the mind. Fixed it though!

    cinemafanatic said:
    April 12, 2013 at 3:02 am

    goddamn yes with all of these. but oh my I would love if Criterion did Stranger Than Fiction. of all of these films, I think it’s the most unfairly overlooked.

      rots28 responded:
      April 12, 2013 at 11:13 am

      My last dying wish is for either Bringing Up Baby or Stranger Than Fiction to get the Criterion treatment. If that happens, I can die a happy cinephile.

      I absolutely adore Stranger Than Fiction. It’s wonderfully written and heartfelt. Have you read the script?

    Brittani said:
    April 12, 2013 at 1:31 pm

    I loved Stranger Than Fiction! It’s just so adorable. I too hope it gets the Criterion treatment.

      rots28 responded:
      April 12, 2013 at 1:56 pm

      It’s in my top ten favorites! I love it!

    Garrett said:
    April 12, 2013 at 2:43 pm

    I recently watched Bringing Up Baby. It’s definitely worthy of a Criterion release.

      rots28 responded:
      April 12, 2013 at 2:45 pm

      Totally agree. It needs to be released, at all, on Blu-ray pronto.

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